The Captive Mind

Chapter 3 of Milosz’s book is titled Ketman which he derives from Arthur Gobineau’s book Religions and Philosophies of Central Asia. In Persia, ketman is a term used to describe intellectuals who would publically support a tyrannical regime while internally arguing against it.  Milosz observed the same phenomena in the totalitarian east and thus adoptedContinue reading “The Captive Mind”

The Captive Mind

In the first chapter of The Captive Mind, Milosz frames his discussion of intellectual submissiveness towards the Soviet regime by discussing the Murti-Bing pill.  Milosz derives this pill from a pre-WWII novel by Stanislaw Witkiewicz, a Polish writer.  The Murti-Bing pill, when taken, eases the consumer worries and makes them complacent about the larger problemsContinue reading “The Captive Mind”

The Captive Mind

Czeslaw Milosz’s The Captive Mind has been on my reading list for about a year now.  I want to read this book because every historian of Europe or the Cold War that I respect has mentioned this book at some point.  Milosz is a fascinating character as he is more known for this book aboutContinue reading “The Captive Mind”